Motor Driver Board for the BBC micro:bit (version 2)

Shield for sensor/input/output

Kitronik

Product Description

A simple way to add motor driving capability to a BBC micro:bit.

(Click here for our  full selection of the BBC micro:bit +  essential accessories/add-ons)

It allows two motors to be driven with full forward, reverse & stop control. It has terminal blocks to connect four input devices and a regulated 3V supply is fed in to the 80 way connector to power the inserted BBC micro:bit.

This makes it ideal for designs such as buggies.

In this new version (version 2) , the pins from the BBC micro:bit are now broken out to pads on the end of the Motor Driver Board. These pads can either be soldered onto directly, or they are the correct spacing for our PCB pin headers (see image below for a close up of the new pads).

 


Motor Driver Board for BBC micro:bit (4 minutes)

It includes an integrated Edge Connector slot for your BBC micro:bit to easily slot into. It also features external connections to the Buttons A and B inputs. This allows additional switches to be connected to the motor driver board and the state of these can then be read by the BBC micro:bit.

+ Add: New Motor Driver Blocks for the PXT editor:

To make it even easier for you, we've created a package that lets you add our Motor Driver blocks to the PXT editor.

Click Add Package and paste https://github.com/KitronikLtd/pxt-kitronik-motor-driver into the box and hit search.

You can now add the blocks to your project as normal.

 

 

Features:

  • Drive 2 motors with full forward, reverse and stop control.
  • Terminal blocks for easy connection of motors and inputs.
  • 4 inputs (2 analogue inputs and 2 provide external connections to Buttons A and B as inputs).
  • Includes Edge Connector for the BBC micro:bit to slot into.
  • Provide regulated power to the BBC micro:bit.

Contents:

  • 1 x Edge Connector Motor Driver Board for the BBC micro:bit.

Dimensions:

    • Length: 67mm.
    • Width: 53mm.
    • Height: 18mm.

Requires:

Resources:

 

Build A Klawsome microbit Controlled Tank
By popular request on twitter, Kitronik Technical Director Dave Sanderson shows you how you can build a totally Klawsome microbit controlled Tank.
PWM 150 Using PWM with the Kitronik Motor Driver Board
Way back when we first released our Motor Driver Board the microbit Block Editor only allowed digital write on the pins we used for controlling motors. This meant that motors had to be full on or off. Thanks to an update in the PXT editor you can now use PWM to control the motors and therefore the speed of your buggy.
micro:bot Robot Buggy Part 1 An Introduction
This fun learning resource has been put together to provide teachers with an all in one design and technology challenge that you can set for your students over the course of a term or a year. The resource includes a number of different design and technology aspects; electronics, mechanical assembly, 2D and 3D design, using a laser cutter, using a 3D printer and coding and testing. There are also alternative production methods highlighted in the individual resources.
Coding With The PXT Editor Robot Buggy Part 6 Coding With The PXT Editor
Martin Woolley explains how he wrote the Robot Buggy code using the Microsoft PXT Editor for the BBC micro:bit. Includes a link to the completed code. Martin not only wrote the code that we use for the remote controlled buggies, he also designed the Bluetooth profile for the BBC micro:bit and wrote and released the micro:bit Blue App, which we used to control the buggys.
The Self Righting Flag Robot Buggy Part 5 The Self Righting Flag
The last part of our physical design challenge was to design a flag for a capture the flag style game. As with most of the design challenges that this project presented, we had some ideas and discarded the difficult and impractical until we were left with a simple but effective solution.
Creating The Perspex Top Plate Robot Buggy Part 3 Creating The Perspex Top Plate
We looked at a few different ways of achieving our Robot Wars inspired buggy but quickly settled on keeping the buggy completely intact and cutting a top plate from a perspex sheet. We wanted it to be functional, aesthetically pleasing and also easy to produce. We had six buggies to design and build and only a few days to get them done.
Remote Control Via Bluetooth Robot Buggy Part 7 Remote Control Via Bluetooth
Bluetooth is the technology that makes the remote control aspect of this project possible, fortunately, the BBC micro:bit comes with Bluetooth functionality as standard. Martin Woolley explains how to pair your Android device with the BBC micro:bit and how to use is micro:bit Blue App to control the Robot Buggy.
line following buggy Robot Buggy Part 2 The Line Following Buggy
The line following buggy for the BBC micro:bit is a great kit for students to build as it combines several elements of design and technology; electronics, mechanical assembly and coding and it is this buggy that the Robot Buggies are built upon. The kit has relatively few parts and is simple to build, making it a suitable option as a classroom activity.
bbc_microbit_line_following_buggy_top_870 BBC micro:bit Line Following Buggy Build Instructions
This is a step by step guide to building the BBC micro:bit Line Following Buggy. The buggy uses two light dependant resistors to control a line following board on the bottom of the chassis to 'follow' black lines.
bett_show_2016_kitronik_stand_150 BBC micro:bit Controlled Crane
This is a step by step guide to customising a toy crane to be controlled with a BBC micro:bit, using the Motor Driver Board for the BBC micro:bit and the built-in accelerometer to detect tilt and turn motions.
order options
HK$ 105.00